What to Consider First When Changing Network Marketing Companies

§ July 29th, 2011 § Filed under Network Marketing, Personal Success § Tagged , , , , , , § No Comments

A number of factors can start you thinking about changing Network Marketing Companies. Disenchantment with corporate management, product issues, customer service support problems, unrealistic compensation plan, and more can start the ball of dissatisfaction rolling.

For me, it is the first signs of something that reflects, or could reflect back, on my personal and professional reputation in a negative way. Anything that could jeopardize the trust that people have in me and that has been developed over a lifetime.

When I begin to think about moving, I create a “decision grid” or a multiple column comparison chart that answers the many questions I’ve itemized below, and many more that are specific to the positions I’m looking at.

Let’s look at the first two categories that you should be considering, and the questions you should be asking:

Corporate

Having worked in the corporate world, and in companies that both downsized with layoffs and upsized with tremendous workforce growth, I’ve become sensitized to the little things that are potential red flags that something is not right at the top.

Do the corporate leaders have a cohesive vision for the company? Do they have experience in Network Marketing, not just in your product manufacturing? Has there been high turnover in management? What is their plan for growth? Is it realistic? Does corporate value and promote success of the distributors? Does the company have the financial backing to weather an economic downturn?

Product or Service

Do you use and love the products or services the company sells? Have there been recent reformulations of products and how are the new products comparing to similar ones in the consumer marketplace? Are the products consumable?  Where are the research and development, manufacturers, and distribution centers located? What is the track record of the product developers or research scientists? Are there any customers reacting adversely to any of the products, and if so, how does customer service handle the complaints? When distributors/consultants provide input, does corporate listen and validate concerns, making adjustments or changes?

I’ll continue in a future post with compensation and more!

Thanks for stopping by!

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